Walworth County Sunday | Janesville Messenger | Stateline News



Walworth County Sunday | Janesville Messenger | Stateline News


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JANESVILLE -- Hundreds of fellow police officers and community members lined the route from McFarland to Janesville on Tuesday to honor Officer Ryan Copeland, who died Monday in a car accident.

The holiday season can be a time to worry about shopping, baking, decorating, wrapping and a never-ending to-do list.

However, the holidays also can be a time to enjoy the beauty of the season with decorated Christmas trees, lighted houses and storefronts, the aroma of hot chocolate and, of course, Santa Claus greeting children as they scurry to meet the jolly old elf.

If you’re looking for a way to bolster your holiday spirit, there’s plenty of seasonal events to enjoy. Here are our top 15 holiday events in the Stateline area:

I would wager that most everyone now knows someone that keeps vegetarian in their diet. Of course, that means they will not be indulging in the entire traditional Thanksgiving dinner of turkey. But there’s no reason to panic; make some minor adjustments to the menu and add one or two more side dishes and you’ll be fine.

One dish everyone looks forward to is the dressing or stuffing. Here’s where you need to make your first adjustment. Make the dressing without meat and use a vegetable stock instead of turkey stock to moisten the bread cubes. Then bake some of the dressing in a separate casserole dish before you stuff the turkey with the rest.

If you like to add the giblets or sausage to the stuffing, you can still do that after you’ve set aside the separate casserole of vegetarian dressing. A word of explanation is probably needed here -- dressing is cooked outside of the bird; stuffing is the same concoction stuffed inside the bird.

Vegetarians need to be sure to get enough protein in their diet without benefit of meat, so you can help them out by including vegetarian dishes high in protein. These dishes could include quinoa, nuts, cheese (good for vegetarians, but not for vegans -- who don’t eat any animal products), lentils, beans, chickpeas, soy and soy products and seitan (extruded wheat protein).

Vegetables generally aren’t high in protein, but spinach, peas, broccoli and Brussels sprouts have more than most.

Lentil quinoa salad

-- This recipe combines two high-protein foods, quinoa and lentil.

1/2 cup quinoa

1-1/4 cups water, plus 2 cups

1/2 cup lentils

1 tsp. Dijon mustard

2 Tbsps. red wine vinegar

1/4 cup vegetable oil

1/4 tsp. garlic powder

1 lime, zested

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 green onions, chopped

1 Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Put the quinoa in a sieve and rinse in cold water. In a large microwave-proof bowl with a cover, add the rinsed quinoa and 1-1/4 cups water. Cover and microwave on high for nine minutes. Let it sit for two minutes, then stir. Quinoa should be tender enough to eat, but with a little pop upon biting.

Put the lentils in a sieve and rinse in cold water. In a saucepan, simmer the lentils in two cups water until the lentils are tender but not mushy, about 30 minutes. Drain and cool.

In a small bowl, whisk the mustard and vinegar together and drizzle in the oil to make an emulsion. Add the garlic powder, lime zest and salt and pepper to taste.

To assemble the salad: In a medium salad bowl, mix the quinoa, lentils, green onions and chopped cilantro. Top the salad with the dressing, toss to coat and serve.

Roasted Brussels sprouts

--From “The Barefoot Contessa” television show.

1-1/2 lbs. Brussels sprouts

3 Tbsps. olive oil

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 tsp. salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Cut off the brown ends of the Brussels sprouts and pull off any yellow outer leaves. Mix them in a bowl with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Pour them on a sheet pan and roast for 35 to 40 minutes, until crisp on the outside and tender on the inside.

Shake the pan from time to time to brown the sprouts evenly. Sprinkle with more kosher salt and serve.

Baked vegetable side dish

1 lb. baby red potatoes, halved

2 Tbsps. olive oil

1/2 lb. Portobello mushrooms

6 cloves unpeeled garlic

2 Tbsps. chopped fresh thyme

1 Tbsp. olive oil

Kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste

1/4 lb. cherry tomatoes

2 Tbsps. toasted pine nuts

1 lb. spinach, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 425 F. Place new potatoes in a shallow roasting pan; drizzle with two tablespoons of olive oil. Roast for 15 minutes, turning once.

Add portobello mushrooms, placing stem sides up, and garlic cloves to pan. Sprinkle with chopped thyme. Drizzle with one tablespoon olive oil and season with kosher salt and black pepper. Return to oven; cook five minutes.

Remove pan from oven and add cherry tomatoes. Return to oven; cook until mushrooms are softened, about five more minutes.

Scatter pine nuts over potatoes and mushrooms.

Wash spinach and slice thinly. Toss with the potato mixture and serve. The spinach will become wilted from the heat of the other vegetables, cooking it just enough while retaining some crispness and all its color.

Cheddar cheese potato bake

4 large russet potatoes (peeled or unpeeled)

1⁄4 cup butter

1 small onion, finely chopped

Salt and pepper

1⁄2 tsp. dried thyme

1 Tbsp. minced fresh garlic (optional)

1-1⁄2 cups shredded cheddar cheese

2 Tbsps. chopped fresh parsley

Preheat oven to 425 F.

Butter a shallow baking dish.

Thinly slice the potatoes and place in the baking dish.

In a small saucepan, heat butter, onion, salt, pepper, garlic powder and thyme until the butter is melted.

Drizzle over potatoes.

Cover and bake for 45 minutes, or until potatoes are tender.

Remove from oven, sprinkle with cheese and parsley.

Return to oven and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes longer, or until cheese is melted.

Endive appetizers

1 (15-oz.) can cannellini beans, rinsed, drained

2 cloves garlic

2 Tbsps. extra virgin olive oil

2 Tbsps. lemon juice, fresh

1/4 cup basil leaves, fresh, torn

30 Belgian endive leaves

1/4 cup California walnuts, toasted, chopped

1/4 cup red bell pepper, chopped

Puree beans, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice in a blender or food processor until smooth.

Add basil and pulse on and off until basil is finely chopped. Spoon equal amounts into endive leaves and top with walnuts and bell pepper.

Lynn Greene is senior editor for CSIMedia, which publishes this paper. To share this column or read past Lynn’s Place columns, go to Contact her at 262-728-3424 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thursday, 19 November 2015 21:38

First snowfall brings 7-10 inches

SOUTH BELOIT -- Snow is expected to begin between 5 p.m. and 7p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, 2015 and continuing through the day Saturday. The highest snow totals are expected to be along the Wisconsin-Illinois border in the South Beloit, Roscoe, Sharon, Genoa City areas.

Four to six inches total are expected, although high temperatures are expected to rise back to 40 degrees by Monday.

Windy conditions will ease overnight Thursday as a low pressure system to the north moves off to the northeast, according to the National Weather Service in Sullivan, Wisconsin.

It will be mostly quiet but cold during the day Friday.

Then, a fast moving low pressure system will move into the region, which should bring our first accumulating snow of the season Friday night into Saturday.

There is still some uncertainty with the eventual track of the low pressure system, which would influence the final snowfall totals, so keep up with the latest forecasts.

Currently, a Winter Storm Watch is in effect from an Iowa county to Milwaukee county line and points south. Four to eight or more inches of snow are possible in the watch area.

The highest snowfall amounts should fall along the WI/IL border. Stay tuned to the latest forecast as amounts may change.

JANESVILLE -- Illinois and Wisconsin are two of 25 states that have announced they will halt the resettlement of Syrian refugees following the terrorist attacks in Paris.

However it is unclear if states can keep refugees out once they are allowed to enter the United States.

JANESVILLE MESSENGER -- The number of coyote attacks on family pets has spiked over the past year, and wildlife experts say it’s a symptom of growing urbanization.

“The days when people can let their pets out without supervision are over, because coyotes will prey on them,” said Michael Foy, wildlife specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. “We’re not going to get rid of them. We’re not going to go back to a rural society. I tell people to treat their small pets like children: Don’t let them out of your sight. (Coyotes) aren’t real common, but (they will attack pets) and people have to be real careful.”

Are you hosting the family’s Thanksgiving dinner this year? If so, plan ahead — it’s less than two weeks away — so that you can enjoy your company instead of spending all your time in the kitchen.

It’s such a traditional event that most people already know what their menu is: turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, a vegetable or two, rolls, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie for dessert.

It’s that time of year ... deer hunting season has begun, at least for those who use a bow. Gun season starts Nov. 21. It’s time to wear blaze orange if you’re out in the woods, whether you are a hunter or not.

Processing venison

Cooking and preparing venison depends on two things: the hunter and the cook. And the more important of the two is the hunter -- he or she is the one primarily responsible for the way the deer is processed.

The most important part of harvesting a deer is the field dressing. I still think they should be “bled,” but this is losing popularity. The whole idea of field dressing is to cool the meat as quickly as possible. This is done by gutting it and removing the innards to create an air cavity, which should be propped open with a stick to let the air circulate.

Get the deer home or to the processor as quickly as possible. This does not include throwing it across the hood of a truck and parading through town with it while you honk your horn. The hood is hot and does not promote quick cooling.  

Depending on the weather, deer can be hung outside to age for several days to a week. Temperatures have to be consistently cold (34 to 40 F) and it should be hung out of the sun -- somewhat tricky with no leaves on the trees. A properly aged venison roast is much superior to one that was frozen outright.

However, when you have too warm of temperatures and don’t take it to a processor, there is no other choice but to immediately butcher and freeze the meet. At this stage it is important to know what you are doing or have someone show you the way to butcher the animal to achieve the best cuts.

The best cuts

It used to be that meat -- game and venison in particular -- were “larded,” meaning they were laced with lard (fat). A larding needle was the instrument with which to do this. Nowadays, of course, no one will admit much to adding fat to an already lean piece of meat such as venison. But it is done. You couldn’t make venison sausage without adding fat of some kind. Actually, most processors tend to use pork and mix the two together -- best to ask before you take it in.

“Barding” is of the same intent: It involves wrapping the meat with strips of bacon or salt pork or rolling the bacon inside of a roast, then slow cooking the whole thing, an easier method for sure.

Shoulder roasts are not so often boned out, rolled and tied, but I think it’s the best way to handle them -- if you have an option. If you are doing your own processing you can roll up some of that bacon or salt pork at the same time.

Tenderloin roasts are very small on deer but very good, and I would suggest you always trim them out and cook that up first -- sort of a victory dinner.

The saddle is the part between the last set of ribs and the rump. If you have the means to control the temperature, and the time it takes, cooking the saddle on an outdoor grill is outstanding.

Rump roasts -- depending on the butcher, you’ll get one or more -- make excellent pot roast.


Cooking it

The two points to remember when cooking venison: Cook it slow and cook it wet, meaning with moisture or other ingredients that will lend moisture. This does not mean you give up searing a venison steak or charcoal grilling a cut. But be forewarned -- for the best taste with those methods you will need to add some fat or, as in barding, fat in the form of bacon.

When cooking venison, or other game animals for that matter, I like to complement its woodsy beginnings with other wild flavorings and ingredients, such as wild rice, nuts, woodland berries and wild greens. This list includes black walnuts, hickory nuts, acorns (if you have the patience), cranberries, blueberries, crabapples, chokecherry, wild grapes, wild plums, dandelion greens, morel mushrooms and fiddleheads.

While some of these you will not get until spring or summer that is for the better. They will add taste and character to your stash of frozen venison.

Pot roast of venison

-- If your rump roast is much bigger than 2 pounds, you will want to add more cooking time.

1 rump roast of venison

Salt and pepper

3 Tbsps. olive oil

1 onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 carrot, grated

8 oz. mushrooms, sliced

3/4 cup wild rice

2 cups chicken or beef stock

1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

1/2 cup black walnuts, or hickory nuts (optional)

2 bay leaves

In roaster pan, heat three tablespoons of olive oil. Saute the onion, garlic, carrots and mushrooms until onions are tender. Add the wild rice and stock and bring to a boil. Stir in cranberries and walnuts.

Salt and pepper the roast and set in roaster on top of the other ingredients. Put in the two bay leaves. Cover the roast and cook at 325 degrees for two hours. If the rice has not absorbed all of the liquid, remove lid for last 15 minutes and cook until liquid is gone.

Remove from oven. Let the meat rest for 15 minutes before slicing thin. Serve with the wild rice.

Venison stew

2 lbs. cubed venison

1/4 lb. bacon, cut in 1-inch pieces

2 leeks

1 clove garlic, minced

8 oz. whole mushrooms

2 or 3 large carrots, diced

2 or 3 parsnips, diced

1 lb. potatoes, diced

3 cups meat broth (chicken, beef, pork, venison)

2 tsps. parsley, dried, crushed

1 tsp. thyme, dried, crushed

Salt and pepper to taste

2 or 3 bay leaves

2 Tbsps instant tapioca

12 oz. fresh greens, cleaned

In saute pan, heat bacon until sizzling. Add cubed venison and keep cooking to brown. Clean and dice leeks and add to pan along with the garlic. Saute until leeks are tender.

Pour this into a slow cooker along with the mushrooms, carrots, parsnips, potatoes, meat stock, parsley, thyme, salt, pepper and bay leaves. Cover with lid and cook on medium for four to six hours (check your slow cooker directions for specific cooking times). Or place in a roaster or Dutch oven at 325 F in the oven for four hours.

For the last hour of cooking, add the tapioca and the greens.

Thursday, 05 November 2015 14:30

Jim Black: Reflections on the moon

On a recent evening as autumn approached, my wife suggested that we build a fire out in the yard in our portable fire pit and enjoy a bottle of wine. It is pretty much how we spend our winter evenings indoors, meditating on the grace of the flames and the mantra of the wood, ruminating on the events that occupy our lives.

STATELINE NEWS -- Imagine living in a world where zombies walk among us, act like us and are confronted with the same day-to-day situations as we are.

Wyatt Elliott and Kris Williamson have.

Their production company, Notebook Entertainment, has created such a world. Elliott and Williamson direct and produce a monthly web series called "The Deadersons," about a city of zombies that tries to associate with a neighboring city of the living after the apocalypse. The series is inspired by the 1960s television series "The Munsters" and "The Addams Family."

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